Karla Diaz has published Prison Gourmet. This is a recipe cookbook and documentation of performances in which she makes prison recipes that were sent to her by inmates from California. These alternative recipes are often notable expressions of freedom, collaboration, comradeship and creative ways of food consumption. An activist, artist and writer, Diaz uses the form of a cooking book to invite readers and the public to engage. These books are limited edition, and are for sale printed on demand. For more info please emails us at: info@slanguagestudio.com

2013 was a busy year for Slanguage and Third World Creative Studio. Mario Ybarra Jr., Karla Diaz, and the Slanguage team worked hard to make things happen throughout the year. In addition, changes occurred in 2013  with Slanguage Studio closing its doors after 12 years in the  community of Wilmington. With creativity it was just time to  move on to the next chapter with Third World Creative Studio. The idea of Third World Creative for or Mario Ybarra Jr., and Karla Diaz  was to expand into a bigger space and focus on a different idea and vision. This blog series will re-cap all the projects Slangauge and Third World produced along with interviews and media for the first part of the year.

January 2013

Double Feature, Honor Fraser Gallery

First gallery exhibition in Los Angeles for Mario Ybarra Jr. after six years

 

Snippet from Honor Fraser Press Release

Honor Fraser is pleased to present Double Feature, a solo exhibition by Wilmington, California based artist Mario Ybarra Jr. This is his first exhibition with the gallery.

Over the past decade, Ybarra has developed a practice centered around storytelling. With an eye and ear for the elements of an engaging narrative, accompanied by healthy doses of wit, Ybarra crafts portraits of people, places and communities that are resonant and universal while rooted in the specific. Using the objects and materials that he finds around him and his subjects, he translates personal stories into resonant and multilayered installations that seamlessly blend the languages of art and life. Often, the installations relate the overlooked or unacknowledged; particularly, the lives and dreams of his family, childhood friends, and colorful personalities that make up his community. He makes connections to these local tales for global audiences far from Wilmington, often by relating these individual stories refracted through lenses such as mass media and popular culture… Read more

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“All I want is one last dance!!. Hope you can come and join us.This Saturday January 18, 2014  we close the doors to our space home for 12 years. 5-10pm…we give the space over to performances, music and stories…a blank canvas.”

The space we held for 12 years will soon be gone, but we will still continue to do what we love. A new journey and new memories to be made.

It is exciting to have the Ell@s collective working with STAC in their 10-week Arts In Action workshop.  This innovative collective explores topics with art, creativity, activism and discusses many important issues such as  gender, inequality and more. They are a true motivation for young womyn and the community. They are part of the bigger picture of Wilmington, expanding and offering such great collectives, spaces and opportunities for the youth to stay busy and gain new knowledge. It is truly special because it is something many of us never had growing up. On that note I got to learn more about Ell@s. Check it…

S.T.A.C Drag Ball

 

When did Ell@s first begin?

Ell@s had our first official meeting in May 2011, but there were a lot of conversations, events, friendships, and collaborations that led up to that first meeting.

 

What was the motivation for starting a feminist collective in this area? Was there anything specific in any of the members experiences that motivated the collective to be created?

One of our biggest motivations for starting a feminist collective was that we didn’t know of any feminist movements, organizations, or circles in the Wilmington/Carson area. A lot of us had organized around feminist issues in our schools, and throughout L.A. and wanted to create a movement in the South Bay. Street harassment, sexual assault, and violence against womyn were issues that got us talking about creating a collective. One of our members (Carmen) organized a show last year called No Cat Calls! The night was a lot of fun and had a serious message around sexual harassment in public. That show was when we started to talk about getting together and finding like-minded folks. As the group expanded, we saw that the collective we wanted to be was a movement, a safe space, and a sisterhood of support. We spent a lot of time getting to know each other and what we envisioned the collective to be before we started doing community/public events.

Taking Back The Night

 

How many Ell@s members are in the collective?

It’s hard to name everyone because Ell@s has had a number of people involved in our group from the beginning. We have expanded since the first meeting but there is a core group of about 10 of us – Sonya, Retro, Syl Via, Jovanna, Maria, Monique, Gloria, Nuria, Carmen, and Shonowa.

 

Are there any special talents or ideas that members bring to the table?

Yes! That is one of the great things about the collective  -we are talented and unique individuals with the same vision. Creativity and art have been a big part of everything we do because we are a creative bunch. We are artists, students, activists, community organizers, hair stylists, poets, musicians, designers, and photographers that come together to heal, create, motivate, inspire, and challenge ourselves and our community. We want our communities to be safe, healthy, free of violence, full of resources, covered with art, and so much more.

How did the idea come about to do a workshop at Slanguage with STAC? What are the main goals for the teens?

Slanguage approached us about hosting the STAC program for the summer. Some of our members had worked with Slanguage in the past through their teen workshop and the WECAN residency. Up until the STAC program, we had collaborated on a  few events in the community – Dia de los Muertos Peace Walk, Womyn’s History Month, Take Back the Night, and GOOD WARNING to mention a few. We were excited to do the STAC program. It was challenging, new, and gave us an opportunity to work with youth. We formed Arts in Action, a 10-week workshop series centered on identity, art, and activism. We wanted to combine our skills and share our knowledge with high school students (everything we wish we would have learned in high school). Our goals for the teens are for them to explore their identity and creative interest in a safe and empowering space. Each Arts in Action workshop is different but has format where we discuss, create art, learn about feminist artists, and feminist herstory.

Has the collective done similar work-shops?

Yes, in the past we have hosted similar workshops. The difference is that the program is youth centered.

 

As you know I able to attend one of your teen workshops and thought it was a great experince! However, how does Ell@s present topics such as class, gender, sexuality, feminism to the teens since unfortunately some teens don’t encounter topics like this in highschool?

We were very glad to have you! That poetry workshop was a lot of fun! You are very right. That was a lot of Ell@s experience in high school and part of why we wanted to discuss these topics. The program is set up give students space to learn from us and teach us as well. We ask them about their lives and experiences so they can find a place to connect.

Sound workshop

For me it is a first to hear of such groups in this area, but it is exciting that so many young people, especially womyn are being more proactive with issues that affect us. Do you feel that new groups with empowering messages for womyn have changed from groups in the past? What is different if so and why?

Yeah, it is very exciting to be a part of a feminist collective in this area, it’s time. Some of Ell@s had done a lot of radical work in the Bay, Orange County, and in other parts of L.A., we wanted to see it in our hometowns. We are not quite sure about the second question… I think our collective is somewhat different from groups in the past. We have an artist approach to how we do things. Ell@s are a creative space, a movement that connects and heals. The collective still feels very new, we have been very busy in our year and a half of existence. We have focused on issues that are current in our communities and relative to our everyday experiences.

 

For those who are interested in joining the collective what do they have to do? Are men also able to join?

If you want to join, you have to dance battle Sonya! Just kidding, simply ask one of us or hit us up on our fan page! We like to take some time to hang out with folks and get to know them, their interests, and visions before they become involved. Ell@s collective is a womyn identified/trans space!

 

What are future plans for Ell@s? What would the group like to accomplish?

We are looking forward to the Slanguage Teen Art Summit! We are close to the end of our Arts in Action workshop series, we’re looking forward to taking time to reconnect and figure out where to move forward. We have a lot of ideas for the future – a Vagina Monologues, another Take Back the Night, and lots of community-based art projects. We want to continue to be a safe space to challenge patriarchy, violence, and injustice in our community.

Good Warning

words to live by

 

For those interested in collaborating with Ell@s or interested in being part of this collective, contact their fan page on Facebook or email them at ellascollective@gmail.com

Also please join us this Saturday, August 11, 2012  as Ell@s Collective in Residency at Slanguage will lead a workshop for their culminating event working with our youth at the Slanguage Teen Arts Summit! Teen Art Summit Event Page

Location: LA><Art 2640 S. La Cienega Los Angeles, CA 90034

11:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

 

Peace,

DJ

 

All photos by Monique Arellanes

Slanguage presents another exciting event at LA><Art! Join us Saturday, August 11, 2012 for The Teen Arts Summit! Our talented teens get together and take over with discussions and collaborations. ! This will also be the last day to VOTE for Slanguage! and we are proud to announce that Joe Buscaino from District 15 will be providing a bus for those in the community interested in going. Check the flier for more details.

 

Location: LA> <Art 2640 S. La Cienega Los Angeles, CA 90034

11:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

For more information visit Made In LA

 

Alrato,

DJ

 

WED | JULY 25 | 7–8:30PM | LAXART
RSVP ASAP to SlanguageRSVP@laxart.org

Slanguage presents the second installment of the Artists Anonymous series during This is a Takeover! A 10 Year Survey of Slanguage, the current exhibition at LAXART for Made In L.A. 2012. This meeting led by artists Christopher Reynolds and Christina Sanchez will attempt to tackle issues of food politics through the language of art. Along with artist presentations and in-depth conversations over food, participants will be given the opportunity to share their thoughts, questions, and concerns for this ever-present topic within the current contemporary art discourse.

Artist presentations: Christopher Reynolds, Christina Sanchez, & Sarah Beadle

Special Guest: Mariana Huerta (Policy Coordinator) of the Restaurant Opportunities Center of Los Angeles

Images: (left) Christopher Reynolds, Conversation Proposal , 2011
(right) Christina Sanchez, Break/Pausa: Two Performance Scores, 2012